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National Adoption Month 2010, Week Three: Share Your Perspective

November 19, 2010

Note: This blog post is part three of a five-part, month-long series by the Miriam Project intended to celebrate and treasure the miracle of adoption during National Adoption Month. We hope that you will check back each week in our effort to improve awareness, education and perspectives about adoption. You can view subsequent parts of our blog series as they become available by following us on Twitter, liking us on Facebook, or bookmarking the NAM2010 link.

By Rob Heaton, Miriam Project Student Assistant

Everyone has a certain sphere of influence – or at least a sphere of people willing to listen to you for a little while.

In addition, everyone has a perspective on adoption. Maybe you don’t know everything there is to know about the extent of the need, or about the adoption process itself, but if you’ve read our first two posts in this National Adoption Month blog series, chances are that your knowledge is on the rise! To recap…

Moreover, research completed by the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption in 2007 showed, among other findings, that nearly half of all Americans have been touched in some way or another by adoption. Consider these statistics from their Executive Summary:

Research by the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption
Even many of those who have not been personally touched by adoption seem to have a favorable opinion of it!

The intent of this post is to encourage you to share your own perspective related to adoption. Wouldn’t it be fitting, then, for the author to first share his?

The church in which I spent my middle school and high school years was relatively small. We never had a paid youth pastor; the youth ministry leaders were volunteers who, at the time I joined the youth group, were themselves just starting their families. Both couples initially had their own children and, later, extended their families by adopting internationally from Russia. As a middle schooler, this was probably my first encounter with adoption, and because I looked up to my youth leaders, this experience planted a favorable seed about adopting. Especially with all of the hoops they had to jump through!

Fast forward to high school, and I had two friends who were open about having been adopted. They even took light-hearted adoption jokes well – one used to say something to the effect of “I know who I am.” Favorable seed number two! I’ve since met other people who have been adopted, with varying degrees of openness about the whole thing. Taken together, these experiences have led my wife and I to keep an open door to adopting when the time comes to expand our family.

Though it’s nothing earth-shattering, maybe my story has you thinking about your own perspective on adoption. If you yourself were adopted, or have adopted, chances are your story is even a little bit better than mine!

All in all, we know that there is power in your adoption story. Will you consider sharing your perspective with someone this week?

  • That’s exactly what Pastor Jim Lyon did, and it inspired the Madison Park community to start the Miriam Project in 1998.
  • That’s exactly what some families who have adopted with the help of the Miriam Project will be doing this Sunday at the Madison Park Church of God. At all three services, adoptive families will be introduced for Adoption Celebration Sunday, and their testimonies will be accompanied by a special adoption video. They are excited to tell their stories, and we hope you’ll join us to gain new insights and perspectives about adoption!

In the meantime, won’t you share your own adoption perspective? Be creative about it. Call or e-mail your friends! Or, if you’re not that bold, consider posting a status update or writing a note on Facebook! We’re betting that not all of your friends are aware that November is National Adoption Month… this too is a great fact to share!

And if you’re willing to share openly, consider leaving a comment on our blog, where your story and your perspective can be enjoyed by many. It could be your perspective that plants the favorable seed with someone else, perhaps even inspiring them to adopt one day.

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